Category Archives: Nature, Wild Life & Environment

A Koh Samui trip may turn out to be your best ever island holiday.

Koh Samui trip

She Sarah Marshall is the content writer for Horizon Homes, a property and relocation company based in Koh Samui, Thailand.  She has kindly written this guest post about a Koh Samui trip I am sure some of jamoroki’s readers may enjoy. When she is not busy at work, she can be seen travelling around Thailand, enjoying the sunshine and food.

A trip to Thailand is not complete without visiting the coastal islands which are rated the best in the world. If there’s one island you cannot miss, it’s Koh Samui. Only 700 kilometres south from Bangkok, Koh Samui is located in the beautiful aquamarine waters of the Chumphorn Archipelago in the Gulf of Thailand.

There are roughly 40,000 people who live on the island, making it feel like a secluded tropical paradise. Samui is the second-largest island in the Archipelago and noted as one of the best for doing outdoor sports. There are many snorkelling trips, boating tours, fishing opportunities, and many other nautical activities. We’ve created a guide on what to plan for your Koh Samui trip. Continue reading A Koh Samui trip may turn out to be your best ever island holiday.

Our Earth – a rubbish dump?

Those who live inland don’t to see what those of us who live on the coast do, every day, during the Sout West Monsoon. Less beach and more rubbish including tons of plastic. Caring volunteers with little help from government clean beaches everywhere.

We may be fighting a losing battle but there is no excuse not to fight.

By 2050, our oceans will have more plastic trash than fish. Continue reading Our Earth – a rubbish dump?

It’s a dog’s life

Shelter Manager’s office at Soi Dog, Phuket

I recently visited Soi Dog in the north of Phuket, Thailand. I wanted to find out more about the non-profit organisation that alleviates the suffering of animals by sterilising and vaccinating dogs and cats. Soi Dog treats sick, injured and abused animals. It also fights the cruel and illegal dog meat trade and shelters and re-homes street dogs and cats. Continue reading It’s a dog’s life

How I survived a jungle trek in Thailand

Rohun Bevan, is an ex-English tennis player, amateur jungle trekker, swims like a shark and until yesterday was a friend of mine. Over a glass of wine a week or so ago he suggested that I may like to enjoy a leisurely Saturday followed by a couple of beers and join him on the ‘Hash House Harriers’ Saturday run, which he quickly changed to walk as I choked on my drink. I hesitantly agreed and at 3.15pm on the following Saturday we assembled, along with 100+ others, at a clearing in the forest behind Tesco supermarket in the Chalong area of Phuket. Continue reading How I survived a jungle trek in Thailand

The death of Earth

I am somewhat ashamed to admit that I did not know that 22nd April was ‘Earth Day’.

So, to atone for my sin – mea maxima culpa – I have put together this short post.

I feel much better already!

The Earth seen from Apollo 17.
The Earth seen from Apollo 17. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We have known, for more than half a century, what we have done and continue to do to the Earth . Yet despite considerable progress we still persist with destructive acts.

English: Rachel Carson, author of Silent Sprin...
English: Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring. Official photo as FWS employee. c. 1940. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rachael Carson told us in her absorbing book ‘Silent Spring’ published in 1962.

She puts it so eloquently when she says:

 “The more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders and realities of the universe about us, the less taste we shall have for destruction.

Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts.

Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life.”

Continue reading The death of Earth

Balancing a love for wildlife with the demand for fossil fuel

In today’s world, when we think about preserving wildlife, it’s rare that you can mix it with the continuous use of oil and gas. The negative effects of fossil fuels on nature have long been publicized in the media. Amongst the most recent was the effects of unused oil and gas, its surrounding environment and most notably the region’s water supplies.

Texas Parks & Wildlife mentioned 4 steps to implement voluntary conservation practices:

1. Start with planning
2. Operations
3. Reclamation
4. Monitoring

There is more general guidance in minimizing impacts of fossil fuel to natural resources in a Texas Parks and Wildlife report. Continue reading Balancing a love for wildlife with the demand for fossil fuel

Fires already?

I have written many times on the subject of atmospheric pollution and although I am taking a break from blogging for a while I cannot contain my emotions when it comes to being exposed to deliberately started forest fires.

While I am managing a building project in Northern Thailand I am staying on the hill slopes of Huai Kaew village, 30 kms north of Chiang Mai, bordering the forests. The climate at this time of year is comfortable. Cool at night and early morning rising to 30c + in the day with no rain except the occasional shower.

But now the burning season starts when the monsoon rains have gone and farmers burn off the dry dead grasses and stubble to stimulate new growth next year around May/June’; then Cutting back excessive growth, clearing land and deforestation for fruit and vegetable farming. Continue reading Fires already?

Are we human?

As Koh Phuket suffers from deliberate crop burning in far-away Sumatra and Northern Thailand prepares itself for the same treatment in February and March each year, I wonder are we obsessed with fire?

Rawai Sunrise – September 2015

Air pollution drifting in from Indonesia changes the landscape in Rawai Bay, Phuket
Air pollution drifting in from Indonesia changes the landscape in Rawai Bay, Phuket

Continue reading Are we human?

How to teach a bird to fly!!!

It seems inconceivable that a mere earthbound creature can teach a budding aeronautical genius to fly. But that is one of the tasks allotted to me following a chance encounter with a stranded fledgling Common Myna bird.

A shoulder to cry on

Storm damage

In our need to protect ourselves from the damage storms can inflict it is easy to overlook the plight of helpless wildlife that lives with us in our daily lives. Trees provide refuge and homes for many creatures and like our own homes they are subjected to the ravages of wind and rain which can tear them limb from limb. This is, of course, all a part of the natural world and unless you accidentally come across a stranded creature, as I did, you will likely be unaware of the loss of wildlife in a big storm. Continue reading How to teach a bird to fly!!!