How responsible are suppliers of gasoline?

I have noticed recently that vending machines have moved on to a whole new level in Thailand. Forget the boring old cholate and jelly bean dispensers because we now have self-service gasoline pumps. They have been around for quite some time now but recently I have seen them installed outside people’s homes, presumably as another way to make a part-time buck.

The idea is that they are there for the convenience of motorcyclists who may live too far away from a gasoline station to be able to refill when they run out. A noble concept indeed for those living in outlying areas. But the majority of the vending pumps I have seen are in built up areas like Phuket where there are plenty of gasoline stations or general vendors who sell gasoline in whiskey bottles for emergencies.

I can only assume that the proliferation of these vending machines in areas where they are not necessary is because the vending machine companies are pushing sales hard. It seems haphazard and unplanned but maybe there is a bigger picture which I don’t know about.

I have no problem with the entrepreneurial spirit but wait!!

I see these machines are unguarded, unsecured, open 24/7 and are accessible to anyone.

That includes;

  • late night revellers who may be drunk and stop to refuel with a lighted cigarette hanging from the corner of their mouths.
  • Children who can easily reach the slot and put a few coins in, then light a firework and blow themselves, their families and anyone in the near vicinity into kingdom come.
  • Anyone with a mind to wreak havoc.
Gasoline, celphone recharge and water dispensers in Phuket
Gasoline, celphone recharge and water dispensers in Phuket

I saw three children between the ages of 7 and 10, a few days ago, playing with the gasoline pump on the left. One of them removed the hose from its holder and pretended to spray the others. I cringed at the thought that one of them may have had a few coins and a box of matches.

I am sure the authorities must have given considerable thought to the potential hazards when they issue licences to the vending machine companies. Surely someone must have to be licenced! This is a lethal, inflammable substance we are talking about.

Or have they either propelled themselves into the next world, hoist by their own petard or moved on to a more exciting project like –

Nuclear 7-elevens???

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “How responsible are suppliers of gasoline?”

  1. Great photo! Unreal world you live in over there! Growing danger around you too, it seems. Thanks for alerting us to this rapidly developing problem. Also, a modern insight into a wholly different culture. Thailand seems to be going down the drain in much the same way as America with the proliferation of guns. With the Thai’s, it’s the analogous insanity of their free-for-all, one-on-every-corner, petrol slot machines! How many kids have to be killed, how many buildings and people blown up before they realize you can’t play laissez-faire with a dangerous substance like gasoline? The lackadaisical, lay-back attitude towards the safety of their precious children, apart from any other consideration, astounds me.

    Like

    1. Amazing as it may seem Pamela they don’t see the danger. Don’t get me going. I can give you countless examples, many of which I’ve covered in my blog posts.

      Here’s a sample. 3 on a motorbike is normal. 4 is quite common and 5 is not unusual. A mix of adults and children down to newborn babies. If one has a helmet on that would be odd!!!And if you are on a bike many of them will be coming at you on the wrong side of the road.

      The Nation newspaper reported in 2013 “Up to 26,000 people are killed in road accidents every year in Thailand, which puts the country in the 6th spot in terms of road casualties. Of those killed, up to 70 or 80 per cent are motorcyclists or their passengers.”

      Scary stuff??

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s