How to liven up your photography with ICM

Unless you are a ‘dyed in the wool’ traditionalist, intentional camera movement (ICM) can really add another dimension to your photography world.

Forest Waking
Forest Waking

Everything in photography is exciting for me as I am relatively new to the game. But it can be daunting to the newcomer when viewing the work of highly accomplished photographers who have perfected their craft over decades. Whilst you may well be inspired you instinctively know you have a long journey ahead of you to get anywhere near approaching their status.

And so it was a jaw dropping moment when I accidentally came across a series of four videos by ‘On Landscape’ featuring Doug Chinnery demonstrating the technique of ICM.

Pastel Bouquet
Pastel Bouquet

The very next day I grabbed my camera and set off to put into practice as much as I could remember of what Doug had said. That more or less amounted to ‘find an interesting place; anywhere will do, use any lens you like as long as you can push the shutter speed down to between 2 and 5 seconds, point the camera at something, focus it, push the button, wiggle the camera around and see what happens.’

That is obviously very much a potted version but the essence is in that paragraph.

I knew that, according to Doug, I would have to take hundreds of shots to get just a few good images so I wasn’t expecting to have much success first time out. However, I was pleasantly surprised and have, after two walks, processed about 30 decent pictures which I quite like.

Forest Shade III
Forest Shade III

The real beauty with ICM is that there are no rules so you can’t do anything wrong!!!!

It’s a personal creative process with absolutely no barriers, limited only by your vision and ideas. You don’t have to travel the world to find stunning locations where the world and his wife will be trying to take the same photos as everybody else. I looked at Table Mountain for 20 years, which is stunningly beautiful, in its many guises. There must have been millions of photos taken over many years, many of which can be seen publicly.

Using ICM you can create beautiful and unique pictures, which nobody else can copy, without setting foot outside your front gate.

Have a go. It’s great fun and so liberating.

I have posted a portfolio of some of my first ICM work on jamoroki-art and I have included a few in this post, as examples, which I have just processed.

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4 thoughts on “How to liven up your photography with ICM”

  1. How interesting. And I have to tell me husband this when he complains about my soft focus backgrounds! Here is something I like to do: Set up the camera timer with your subject in focus in the foreground, then as the camera goes off, wave a colored scarf or fabric behind the subject. You get interesting, pleasing background colors that are out of focus because of the movement.

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    1. That’s a novel (excuse the pun) idea Cinda. I believe shooting through different kinds of translucent material without waving the material produces interesting results too. If only I had time who knows what!!!
      James.

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    1. Well Jackie. I was never the photographer so, I suppose it’s all rewarding to me. But I must say I do believe some professional photographers are over critical and by that take the artistic licence away a little. I just love the freedom, like you say, and yes it is the way it should be for the creativity in us to flourish. Keep well. James

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